Verse of the Day
(May be more than one verse)
October 21-22, 2019
Gray Text Box
Luke 14:31-33 - Counting the Cost of Christian Discipleship
Speaking to the multitudes (many people) who were with him, Jesus said:

Verses 31-32: "Or what king [or leader], going [intending, planning] to make war against another king [or leader], sitteth not down first, and consulteth [considers, asks his advisors] whether he [will] be able with ten thousand [soldiers, etc.] to meet [successfully fight with, gain victory over] him that cometh against him with twenty thousand [soldiers, etc.]? Or else [if he thinks they will be defeated], while the other [king (or leader) and accompanying army or group of fighters] is yet a great way off, he [the first king (or leader)] sendeth an ambassage [dispatches (sends off) an ambassador, diplomat, envoy], and desireth conditions of peace."

Verse 33: "
So likewise, whosoever he [or she] be of you that forsaketh not [is not willing to give up] all [of the things] that he [or she] hath [has or loves] [in order to follow me (Jesus)], he [or she] cannot be my disciple [see explanation below*]."

Although the highlighted phrases about peace and war in verses 31-32 above are true, according to most of the commentaries that I read, those verses are actually a parable about Christian discipleship (i.e., following Jesus, or becoming his disciple), and they liken the Christian life to a war against Satan and his followers.

Note:
Christian discipleship is discussed in the GotQuestions.org article entitled "What is Christian discipleship?" If you want to read it, here's the link: https://www.gotquestions.org/Christian-discipleship.html.
_________________________

*Albert Barnes, John Gill, and Charles Spurgeon have good explanations of this parable.

-- In his commentary on verse 32, Mr. Barnes says:

"An ambassage - Persons to treat with an enemy and propose terms of peace. These expressions are not to be improperly pressed in order to obtain from them a spiritual signification. The general scope of the parable is to be learned from the connection, and may be thus expressed:

"1. Every man who becomes a follower of Jesus should calmly and deliberately look at all the consequences of such an act and be prepared to meet them.

"2. Men in other things act with prudence and forethought. They do not begin to build without a reasonable prospect of being able to finish. They do not go to war when there is every prospect that they will be defeated.

"3. Religion is a work of soberness, of thought, of calm and fixed purpose, and no man can properly enter on it who does not resolve by the grace of God to fulfil all its requirements and make it the business of his life.

"4. We are to expect difficulties in religion. It will cost us the mortification of our sins, and a life of self-denial, and a conflict with our lusts, and the enmity [hatred] and ridicule of the world. Perhaps it may cost us our reputation, or possibly our lives and liberties, and all that is dear to us; but we must cheerfully undertake all this, and be prepared for it all.

"5. If we do not deliberately resolve to leave all things, to suffer all things that may be laid on us, and to persevere to the end of our days in the service of Christ, we cannot be his disciples. No man can be a Christian who, when he makes a profession, is resolved after a while to turn back to the world; nor can he be a true Christian if he 'expects that he will' turn back. If he comes not with a 'full' purpose 'always' to be a Christian; if he means not to persevere, by the grace of God, through all hazards, and trials, and temptations; if he is not willing to bear his cross, and meet contempt, and poverty, and pain, and death, without turning back, he 'cannot' be a disciple of the Lord Jesus."

(Source for Barnes quote: https://www.studylight.org/commentary/luke/14-32.html, "Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible")

-- This is what John Gill said about the meaning of verse 32:

"and desireth conditions of peace; greatly to his disadvantage and reproach: so to give out, and leave off fighting with sin, Satan, and the world, and make peace with them, is shameful and scandalous; but on the other hand, such who have engaged in this war, should pursue it with rigour and courage; considering that God is on their side; that Christ is the captain of their salvation; that the Spirit of God that is in them, is greater than he that is in the world; that angels encamp around them; that it is a good cause they are engaged in; that they have good weapons, the whole armour of God provided for them; are sure of victory, and shall at last enjoy the crown of life, righteousness and glory."

(Source for John Gill's quote: https://www.studylight.org/commentary/luke/14-32.html, "John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible")

-- And here's the meaning of verse 33, according to Charles Spurgeon:

"In Christ's days, and afterwards, discipleship usually involved the absolute giving up of everything that his followers had, for those were times of persecution; and if such seasons should come to us, we must have such love to Christ that, for his sake, we could forsake all that we have; otherwise we cannot be his disciples."

(Source: www.studylight.org/commentaries/spe/luke-14.html, "Verses 25-35," "Luke 14:33")





Gray Text Box
Luke 14:31-33 - Counting the Cost of Christian Discipleship
Speaking to the multitudes (many people) who were with him, Jesus said:

Verses 31-32: "Or what king [or leader], going [intending, planning] to make war against another king [or leader], sitteth not down first, and consulteth [considers, asks his advisors] whether he [will] be able with ten thousand [soldiers, etc.] to meet [successfully fight with, gain victory over] him that cometh against him with twenty thousand [soldiers, etc.]? Or else [if he thinks they will be defeated], while the other [king (or leader) and accompanying army or group of fighters] is yet a great way off, he [the first king (or leader)] sendeth an ambassage [dispatches (sends off) an ambassador, diplomat, envoy], and desireth conditions of peace."

Verse 33: "
So likewise, whosoever he [or she] be of you that forsaketh not [is not willing to give up] all [of the things] that he [or she] hath [has or loves] [in order to follow me (Jesus)], he [or she] cannot be my disciple [see explanation below*]."

Although the highlighted phrases about peace and war in verses 31-32 above are true, according to most of the commentaries that I read, those verses are actually a parable about Christian discipleship (i.e., following Jesus, or becoming his disciple), and they liken the Christian life to a war against Satan and his followers.

Note:
Christian discipleship is discussed in the GotQuestions.org article entitled "What is Christian discipleship?" If you want to read it, here's the link: https://www.gotquestions.org/Christian-discipleship.html.
_________________________

*Albert Barnes, John Gill, and Charles Spurgeon have good explanations of this parable.

-- In his commentary on verse 32, Mr. Barnes says:

"An ambassage - Persons to treat with an enemy and propose terms of peace. These expressions are not to be improperly pressed in order to obtain from them a spiritual signification. The general scope of the parable is to be learned from the connection, and may be thus expressed:

"1. Every man who becomes a follower of Jesus should calmly and deliberately look at all the consequences of such an act and be prepared to meet them.

"2. Men in other things act with prudence and forethought. They do not begin to build without a reasonable prospect of being able to finish. They do not go to war when there is every prospect that they will be defeated.

"3. Religion is a work of soberness, of thought, of calm and fixed purpose, and no man can properly enter on it who does not resolve by the grace of God to fulfil all its requirements and make it the business of his life.

"4. We are to expect difficulties in religion. It will cost us the mortification of our sins, and a life of self-denial, and a conflict with our lusts, and the enmity [hatred] and ridicule of the world. Perhaps it may cost us our reputation, or possibly our lives and liberties, and all that is dear to us; but we must cheerfully undertake all this, and be prepared for it all.

"5. If we do not deliberately resolve to leave all things, to suffer all things that may be laid on us, and to persevere to the end of our days in the service of Christ, we cannot be his disciples. No man can be a Christian who, when he makes a profession, is resolved after a while to turn back to the world; nor can he be a true Christian if he 'expects that he will' turn back. If he comes not with a 'full' purpose 'always' to be a Christian; if he means not to persevere, by the grace of God, through all hazards, and trials, and temptations; if he is not willing to bear his cross, and meet contempt, and poverty, and pain, and death, without turning back, he 'cannot' be a disciple of the Lord Jesus."

(Source for Barnes quote: https://www.studylight.org/commentary/luke/14-32.html, "Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible")

-- This is what John Gill said about the meaning of verse 32:

"and desireth conditions of peace; greatly to his disadvantage and reproach: so to give out, and leave off fighting with sin, Satan, and the world, and make peace with them, is shameful and scandalous; but on the other hand, such who have engaged in this war, should pursue it with rigour and courage; considering that God is on their side; that Christ is the captain of their salvation; that the Spirit of God that is in them, is greater than he that is in the world; that angels encamp around them; that it is a good cause they are engaged in; that they have good weapons, the whole armour of God provided for them; are sure of victory, and shall at last enjoy the crown of life, righteousness and glory."

(Source for John Gill's quote: https://www.studylight.org/commentary/luke/14-32.html, "John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible")

-- And here's the meaning of verse 33, according to Charles Spurgeon:

"In Christ's days, and afterwards, discipleship usually involved the absolute giving up of everything that his followers had, for those were times of persecution; and if such seasons should come to us, we must have such love to Christ that, for his sake, we could forsake all that we have; otherwise we cannot be his disciples."

(Source: www.studylight.org/commentaries/spe/luke-14.html, "Verses 25-35," "Luke 14:33")





Note: In case you're wondering, before adding my comments in brackets
to the above verse(s), I usually refer to commentaries by Adam Clarke,
Albert Barnes, John Gill, and Matthew Henry (which can be found online)
and try to summarize what they say. For verses from Proverbs, I also refer
to the Bible study notes written by Jim Delany, pastor of Salem
Bible Church. Word definitions are taken from online
dictionaries (including Bible dictionaries).


*  *  *  *  *

Note: The book of Proverbs has 31 chapters and is full of wisdom.
It's been suggested in the past that Christians should get in the habit
of reading one chapter from Proverbs each day, corresponding to
the date of the month. I think it's a great idea and have decided
to follow that advice. The chapter for today is posted below:


Proverbs Chapter 22

1 A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches, and loving favour rather than silver and gold.
2 The rich and poor meet together: the LORD is the maker of them all.
3 A prudent man foreseeth the evil, and hideth himself: but the simple pass on, and are punished.
4 By humility and the fear of the LORD are riches, and honour, and life.
5 Thorns and snares are in the way of the froward: he that doth keep his soul shall be far from them.
6 Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.
7 The rich ruleth over the poor, and the borrower is servant to the lender.
8 He that soweth iniquity shall reap vanity: and the rod of his anger shall fail.
9 He that hath a bountiful eye shall be blessed; for he giveth of his bread to the poor.
10 Cast out the scorner, and contention shall go out; yea, strife and reproach shall cease.
11 He that loveth pureness of heart, for the grace of his lips the king shall be his friend.
12 The eyes of the LORD preserve knowledge, and he overthroweth the words of the transgressor.
13 The slothful man saith, There is a lion without, I shall be slain in the streets.
14 The mouth of strange women is a deep pit: he that is abhorred of the LORD shall fall therein.
15 Foolishness is bound in the heart of a child; but the rod of correction shall drive it far from him.
16 He that oppresseth the poor to increase his riches, and he that giveth to the rich, shall surely come to want.
17 Bow down thine ear, and hear the words of the wise, and apply thine heart unto my knowledge.
18 For it is a pleasant thing if thou keep them within thee; they shall withal be fitted in thy lips.
19 That thy trust may be in the LORD, I have made known to thee this day, even to thee.
20 Have not I written to thee excellent things in counsels and knowledge,
21 That I might make thee know the certainty of the words of truth; that thou mightest answer the words of truth to them that send unto thee?
22 Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
23 For the LORD will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them.
24 Make no friendship with an angry man; and with a furious man thou shalt not go:
25 Lest thou learn his ways, and get a snare to thy soul.
26 Be not thou one of them that strike hands, or of them that are sureties for debts.
27 If thou hast nothing to pay, why should he take away thy bed from under thee?
28 Remove not the ancient landmark, which thy fathers have set.
29 Seest thou a man diligent in his business? he shall stand before kings; he shall not stand before mean men.

Note: In case you're wondering, before adding my comments in brackets to the above verse(s),
I usually refer to commentaries by Adam Clarke, Albert Barnes, John Gill, and Matthew Henry
(which can be found online) and try to summarize what they say. For verses from Proverbs,
I also refer to the Bible study notes written by Jim Delany, pastor of Salem Bible Church.
Word definitions are taken from online dictionaries (including Bible dictionaries).


*  *  *  *  *

Note: The book of Proverbs has 31 chapters and is full of wisdom.
It's been suggested in the past that Christians should get in the habit
of reading one chapter from Proverbs each day, corresponding to
the date of the month. I think it's a great idea and have decided
to follow that advice. The chapter for today is posted below:


Proverbs Chapter 22

1 A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches, and loving favour rather than silver and gold.
2 The rich and poor meet together: the LORD is the maker of them all.
3 A prudent man foreseeth the evil, and hideth himself: but the simple pass on, and are punished.
4 By humility and the fear of the LORD are riches, and honour, and life.
5 Thorns and snares are in the way of the froward: he that doth keep his soul shall be far from them.
6 Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.
7 The rich ruleth over the poor, and the borrower is servant to the lender.
8 He that soweth iniquity shall reap vanity: and the rod of his anger shall fail.
9 He that hath a bountiful eye shall be blessed; for he giveth of his bread to the poor.
10 Cast out the scorner, and contention shall go out; yea, strife and reproach shall cease.
11 He that loveth pureness of heart, for the grace of his lips the king shall be his friend.
12 The eyes of the LORD preserve knowledge, and he overthroweth the words of the transgressor.
13 The slothful man saith, There is a lion without, I shall be slain in the streets.
14 The mouth of strange women is a deep pit: he that is abhorred of the LORD shall fall therein.
15 Foolishness is bound in the heart of a child; but the rod of correction shall drive it far from him.
16 He that oppresseth the poor to increase his riches, and he that giveth to the rich, shall surely come to want.
17 Bow down thine ear, and hear the words of the wise, and apply thine heart unto my knowledge.
18 For it is a pleasant thing if thou keep them within thee; they shall withal be fitted in thy lips.
19 That thy trust may be in the LORD, I have made known to thee this day, even to thee.
20 Have not I written to thee excellent things in counsels and knowledge,
21 That I might make thee know the certainty of the words of truth; that thou mightest answer the words of truth to them that send unto thee?
22 Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
23 For the LORD will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them.
24 Make no friendship with an angry man; and with a furious man thou shalt not go:
25 Lest thou learn his ways, and get a snare to thy soul.
26 Be not thou one of them that strike hands, or of them that are sureties for debts.
27 If thou hast nothing to pay, why should he take away thy bed from under thee?
28 Remove not the ancient landmark, which thy fathers have set.
29 Seest thou a man diligent in his business? he shall stand before kings; he shall not stand before mean men.