Verse of the Day
(May be more than one verse)
December 7, 2019
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Leviticus 19:13: "Thou shalt not [you shall not] defraud thy neighbour [cheat anyone--neighbor, employee, stranger, friend, small business owner, etc.], neither [or] rob him [or her]: the wages of him [or her] that is hired [referring to a hired servant, someone who provides a product or service, or--in this case specifically (i.e., in Bible times, when the verse was written)--a day laborer, whose wages were due at night] shall not abide with thee [remain with you] all night until the morning."

Nowadays, most people are paid weekly, biweekly (every two weeks), or monthly rather than on a daily basis. No matter when the money is due, employees should always be paid on time.

The following story shows why it's important to pay our bills on time:

"Sad result of an unpaid bill

"A wealthy banker, who is noted for his large subscriptions to charities, and for his kindly habits of private benevolence, was called on by his pastor, one evening, and asked to go with him to the help of a man who had attempted suicide. They found the man in a wretched house, in an alley not far from the banker's dwelling. The front room was a cobbler's shop; behind it, on a miserable bed, in the kitchen, lay the poor shoemaker, with a gaping gash in his throat, while his wife and children were gathered about him. 'We have been without food for days,' said the woman, when he returned. 'It is not my husband's fault. He is a hard-working, sober man. But he could neither get work, nor [get] pay for that which he had done. To-day he went for the last time to collect a debt due to him by a rich family, but the gentleman was not at home. My husband was weak from fasting, and seeing us starving drove him mad. So it ended that way,' turning to the fainting, motionless figure on the bed. The banker, having fed and warmed the family, hurried home, opened his desk and took out a file of little bills. All his large debts were promptly met, but he was apt to be careless about the accounts of milk, bread, &c. [etc.], because they were so petty [small, insignificant]. He found there a bill of Michael Goodlow's for repairing children's shoes … Michael Goodlow was the [man who had attempted to commit] suicide. It was the banker's unpaid debt which had brought these people to the verge of the grave, and driven this man to desperation, while, at the very time, the banker had given away hundreds [of dollars] in charity. The cobbler recovered, and will never [be in] want [of] a friend while the banker lives, nor will a small unpaid bill ever again be found on the banker's table. No man has a right to be generous until his debts are paid; and the most efficient use of money is not alone in almsgiving [charity], but to pay liberally and promptly the people whom we employ."

(Source for above quote: https://www.studylight.org/commentary/leviticus/19-13.html, "The Biblical Illustrator")





Gray Text Box
Leviticus 19:13: "Thou shalt not [you shall not] defraud thy neighbour [cheat anyone--neighbor, employee, stranger, friend, small business owner, etc.], neither [or] rob him [or her]: the wages of him [or her] that is hired [referring to a hired servant, someone who provides a product or service, or--in this case specifically (i.e., in Bible times, when the verse was written)--a day laborer, whose wages were due at night] shall not abide with thee [remain with you] all night until the morning."

Nowadays, most people are paid weekly, biweekly (every two weeks), or monthly rather than on a daily basis. No matter when the money is due, employees should always be paid on time.

The following story shows why it's important to pay our bills on time:

"Sad result of an unpaid bill

"A wealthy banker, who is noted for his large subscriptions to charities, and for his kindly habits of private benevolence, was called on by his pastor, one evening, and asked to go with him to the help of a man who had attempted suicide. They found the man in a wretched house, in an alley not far from the banker's dwelling. The front room was a cobbler's shop; behind it, on a miserable bed, in the kitchen, lay the poor shoemaker, with a gaping gash in his throat, while his wife and children were gathered about him. 'We have been without food for days,' said the woman, when he returned. 'It is not my husband's fault. He is a hard-working, sober man. But he could neither get work, nor [get] pay for that which he had done. To-day he went for the last time to collect a debt due to him by a rich family, but the gentleman was not at home. My husband was weak from fasting, and seeing us starving drove him mad. So it ended that way,' turning to the fainting, motionless figure on the bed. The banker, having fed and warmed the family, hurried home, opened his desk and took out a file of little bills. All his large debts were promptly met, but he was apt to be careless about the accounts of milk, bread, &c. [etc.], because they were so petty [small, insignificant]. He found there a bill of Michael Goodlow's for repairing children's shoes … Michael Goodlow was the [man who had attempted to commit] suicide. It was the banker's unpaid debt which had brought these people to the verge of the grave, and driven this man to desperation, while, at the very time, the banker had given away hundreds [of dollars] in charity. The cobbler recovered, and will never [be in] want [of] a friend while the banker lives, nor will a small unpaid bill ever again be found on the banker's table. No man has a right to be generous until his debts are paid; and the most efficient use of money is not alone in almsgiving [charity], but to pay liberally and promptly the people whom we employ."

(Source for above quote: https://www.studylight.org/commentary/leviticus/19-13.html, "The Biblical Illustrator")





vNote: In case you're wondering, before adding my comments in brackets to the above verse(s),
I usually refer to commentaries by Adam Clarke, Albert Barnes, John Gill, and Matthew Henry
(which can be found online) and try to summarize what they say. For verses from Proverbs,
I also refer to the Bible study notes written by Jim Delany, pastor of Salem Bible Church.
Word definitions are taken from online dictionaries (including Bible dictionaries).


*  *  *  *  *

Note: The book of Proverbs has 31 chapters and is full of wisdom.
It's been suggested in the past that Christians should get in the habit
of reading one chapter from Proverbs each day, corresponding to
the date of the month. I think it's a great idea and have decided
to follow that advice. The chapter for today is posted below:


Proverbs Chapter 7

1 My son, keep my words, and lay up my commandments with thee.
2 Keep my commandments, and live; and my law as the apple of thine eye.
3 Bind them upon thy fingers, write them upon the table of thine heart.
4 Say unto wisdom, Thou art my sister; and call understanding thy kinswoman:
5 That they may keep thee from the strange woman, from the stranger which flattereth with her words.
6 ¶ For at the window of my house I looked through my casement,
7 And beheld among the simple ones, I discerned among the youths, a young man void of understanding,
8 Passing through the street near her corner; and he went the way to her house,
9 In the twilight, in the evening, in the black and dark night:
10 And, behold, there met him a woman with the attire of an harlot, and subtil of heart.
11 (She is loud and stubborn; her feet abide not in her house:
12 Now is she without, now in the streets, and lieth in wait at every corner.)
13 So she caught him, and kissed him, and with an impudent face said unto him,
14 I have peace offerings with me; this day have I payed my vows.
15 Therefore came I forth to meet thee, diligently to seek thy face, and I have found thee.
16 I have decked my bed with coverings of tapestry, with carved works, with fine linen of Egypt.
17 I have perfumed my bed with myrrh, aloes, and cinnamon.
18 Come, let us take our fill of love until the morning: let us solace ourselves with loves.
19 For the goodman is not at home, he is gone a long journey:
20 He hath taken a bag of money with him, and will come home at the day appointed.
21 With her much fair speech she caused him to yield, with the flattering of her lips she forced him.
22 He goeth after her straightway, as an ox goeth to the slaughter, or as a fool to the correction of the stocks;
23 Till a dart strike through his liver; as a bird hasteth to the snare, and knoweth not that it is for his life.
24 ¶ Hearken unto me now therefore, O ye children, and attend to the words of my mouth.
25 Let not thine heart decline to her ways, go not astray in her paths.
26 For she hath cast down many wounded: yea, many strong men have been slain by her.
27 Her house is the way to hell, going down to the chambers of death.

Note: In case you're wondering, before adding my comments in brackets
to the above verse(s), I usually refer to commentaries by Adam Clarke,
Albert Barnes, John Gill, and Matthew Henry (which can be found online)
and try to summarize what they say. For verses from Proverbs, I also refer
to the Bible study notes written by Jim Delany, pastor of Salem
Bible Church. Word definitions are taken from online
dictionaries (including Bible dictionaries).


*  *  *  *  *

Note: The book of Proverbs has 31 chapters and is full of wisdom.
It's been suggested in the past that Christians should get in the habit
of reading one chapter from Proverbs each day, corresponding to
the date of the month. I think it's a great idea and have decided
to follow that advice. The chapter for today is posted below:


Proverbs Chapter 7

1 My son, keep my words, and lay up my commandments with thee.
2 Keep my commandments, and live; and my law as the apple of thine eye.
3 Bind them upon thy fingers, write them upon the table of thine heart.
4 Say unto wisdom, Thou art my sister; and call understanding thy kinswoman:
5 That they may keep thee from the strange woman, from the stranger which flattereth with her words.
6 ¶ For at the window of my house I looked through my casement,
7 And beheld among the simple ones, I discerned among the youths, a young man void of understanding,
8 Passing through the street near her corner; and he went the way to her house,
9 In the twilight, in the evening, in the black and dark night:
10 And, behold, there met him a woman with the attire of an harlot, and subtil of heart.
11 (She is loud and stubborn; her feet abide not in her house:
12 Now is she without, now in the streets, and lieth in wait at every corner.)
13 So she caught him, and kissed him, and with an impudent face said unto him,
14 I have peace offerings with me; this day have I payed my vows.
15 Therefore came I forth to meet thee, diligently to seek thy face, and I have found thee.
16 I have decked my bed with coverings of tapestry, with carved works, with fine linen of Egypt.
17 I have perfumed my bed with myrrh, aloes, and cinnamon.
18 Come, let us take our fill of love until the morning: let us solace ourselves with loves.
19 For the goodman is not at home, he is gone a long journey:
20 He hath taken a bag of money with him, and will come home at the day appointed.
21 With her much fair speech she caused him to yield, with the flattering of her lips she forced him.
22 He goeth after her straightway, as an ox goeth to the slaughter, or as a fool to the correction of the stocks;
23 Till a dart strike through his liver; as a bird hasteth to the snare, and knoweth not that it is for his life.
24 ¶ Hearken unto me now therefore, O ye children, and attend to the words of my mouth.
25 Let not thine heart decline to her ways, go not astray in her paths.
26 For she hath cast down many wounded: yea, many strong men have been slain by her.
27 Her house is the way to hell, going down to the chambers of death.